Evidence-Based Selling

Our evidence-based selling training will help prepare your sales teams with the knowledge they need to shift their dialogue beyond product features and benefits and enable deeper discussions with clinicians and other decision makers.


Clinical Practice Guidelines in Disease Management

This module begins with a general overview of clinical practice guidelines, and then describes how they are developed and implemented. In addition, a link to current clinical practice guidelines as issued by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) is included for example review.

Effective Evidence-Based Medicine Oriented Sales Calls

This module assumes the representative conducts pre-call planning with an EBM strategy (and objective) in mind.

Ethical Issues Related to Drug Safety Monitoring, Pricing, and Off-Label Promotion

Life science companies have ethical responsibilities beyond compliant advertising and promotional activities. This module examines regulatory and industry response to: - Pharmacovigilance: Increasingly, manufacturers are being held accountable for the safety of their products once they have entered the marketplace. In addition to reporting issues associated with their products, companies may be required by the FDA to take additional risk mitigation steps. - Pricing: Companies doing business with certain federal programs must comply with pricing rules, but they must also consider the broader ethical implications of the prices they charge for their products, weighing public good against the needs of the organization and future product development. - Off-label promotion: Sales professionals must also be familiar with their companies' policies on the issue of off-label promotion - what they can and cannot do when a prescriber asks about using a medicine for an indication not specifically approved by regulatory authorities.

Evaluating the Importance and Clinical Relevance of Study Results

This module examines three questions that pertain to the real value and implications of a trial:
What is the magnitude of the treatment effect?
What is the precision of the treatment effect?
Was the sample size large enough to achieve adequate statistical power?

Evidence Based Medicine as a Sales Strategy

This module looks at EBM as a sales strategy, considers the regulatory implications, and outlines an approach to planning an EBM sales call.

Factors that Affect the Validity of Trial Results

This module helps you answer several relevant questions:
Were patients randomly assigned to the different study groups?
Were all patients accounted for at the conclusion of the study?
Were the patients, clinicians, and study trial personnel blinded to the condition(s) to which patients were enrolled?
Were characteristics of the groups similar at baseline?
Were the groups treated equally, except for the investigational intervention?
Can the diagnostic tests used be validated against a gold standard?

Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) Measures

This module describes the components of HRQOL measures and the use of instruments for measuring general health status, as well as disease-specific instruments. The module concludes with examples of how HRQOL data are being gathered and applied within healthcare organizations.

History and Definition of Evidence-Based Medicine

This module describes the historical background of EBM and defines the term as it is used today. It also describes the three main components of EBM and how they can be integrated with a patient-centric approach to care.

Oncology Utilization Management: Excluding Drugs from the Formulary (COMING SOON)

To manage utilization of cancer drugs, more pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) and health plans are excluding drugs from their formularies. With formulary exclusions, these payers aim to limit patient access to more expensive drugs and reduce drug spending. This piece of the Oncology Utilization Management series includes a description of the purpose, goals, and effects of excluding drugs from the formulary and why sales forces should care.

Oncology Utilization Management: Implementing Step Edits (“Fail First” Policies) (COMING SOON)

Step edits, also known as step therapy or "fail first" policies, are the most common method used by payers to manage utilization of specialty drugs, according to a study by Health Affairs. These policies require that a patient try a payer's preferred generic or brand as the initial "step" before another brand will be covered - even if the physician recommends a different brand in the same class or category as the payer's preferred drug. This piece of the Oncology Utilization Management series includes a description of the purpose, goals, and effects of implementing step edits or "fail first" policies and why sales forces should care.

Oncology Utilization Management: Increasing Patient Cost-Sharing and Using Tiered Formularies (COMING SOON)

To manage utilization of cancer drugs, more payers are increasing patient cost-sharing and using tiered formularies. By shifting more costs to patients, payers aim to reduce their own costs while discouraging use of more expensive therapies. This piece of the Oncology Utilization Management series includes a description of the purpose, goals, types, and effects of cost-sharing and tiered formularies and why sales forces should care.

Oncology Utilization Management: Managing to FDA Labeling (COMING SOON)

Managing to FDA labeling is a utilization management tool used by health plans and pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) to control the use of prescription drugs and potentially reduce costs. This piece of the Oncology Utilization Management series includes a description of the purpose, goals, and effects of managing to FDA labeling and why sales forces should care.

Oncology Utilization Management: Optimizing the Site of Care (COMING SOON)

Patients can receive infusions of anticancer drugs in multiple settings, including hospital outpatient clinics, physician offices, standalone infusion clinics, and at home (via home infusion providers). Not all of these options cost commercial health plans the same: Hospitals tend to be the most expensive sites, compared with other settings. (That said, Medicare payments for outpatient chemotherapy do not vary much by site of care.)

Site of care optimization is an increasingly popular strategy that many commercial health plans are using to contain costs. Specifically, they are implementing policies to transition more patients from receiving infusions in hospital settings to less costly settings that are still clinically appropriate. This piece of the Oncology Utilization Management series includes a description of the purpose, goals, and effects of optimizing the site of care and why sales forces should care.

Oncology Utilization Management: Prior Authorizations in Oncology (COMING SOON)

Prior authorizations (PAs) are a common utilization management tool used by managed care plans to control the use of prescription drugs. PAs require prescribers to get preapproval before a plan will cover, or pay for, a prescribed drug. This piece of the Oncology Utilization Management series includes a description of the purpose, goals, and effects of prior authorizations in oncology and why sales forces should care.

Oncology Utilization Management: Setting Quantity Limits and Using Split-fill Programs (COMING SOON)

Quantity limits and split-fill programs are utilization management tools used by payers to control the use of prescription drugs. Quantity limits, also known as supply limits, restrict the amount of a drug that a payer will cover during a specific time period. Split-fill (also known as partial-fill) programs dispense medications in half-quantities (such as a 15-day supply instead of a 30-day supply) and often target drugs with high discontinuation rates, including oral oncology products. This piece of the Oncology Utilization Management series includes a description of the purpose, goals, and effects of setting quantity limits and using split fill programs and why sales forces should care.

Oncology Utilization Management: Using Case Management (COMING SOON)

Case management (sometimes called care management) is a strategy to reduce costs during cancer treatment by preventing inappropriate utilization and helping patients manage their disease. This piece of the Oncology Utilization Management series includes a description of the purpose, goals and effects of using case management and why sales forces should care.

Oncology Utilization Management: Using Value Frameworks and Clinical Pathways (COMING SOON)

This piece of the Oncology Utilization Management series includes a description of the purpose, goals, and effects of using value frameworks and clinical pathways and why sales forces should care.

Opportunities Behind the Clinician’s Evidence-Based Medicine Challenge

This module looks at why clinicians often find it challenging to integrate evidence-based medicine (EBM) into clinical decision-making, and how their challenge can become your opportunity. Clinicians are more likely to be responsive to your product message if you become skilled at examining trial results from their viewpoint and providing evidence through study reprints and other support materials.

Postmarketing Drug Research

This module looks at the types of research that occur typically as postmarketing investigations - ie, when the drug is approved and in wide-scale clinical use. Such investigations include - FDA postmarketing surveillance (Phase IV) investigations to confirm a product's ongoing safety and Studies to evaluate a product's value in relation to alternative approved therapies - Comparative effectiveness research (CER), Pharmacoeconomic studies, and Non-inferiority studies.

Research Protocols

This module discusses the makeup of a research protocol and introduces you to several important concepts related to study design.

Research Reports and the Role of Statistical Analysis

This module discusses the benefits that published literature brings to the healthcare community and helps you determine which publications are likely to be most credible. It also sets the stage for understanding the contents of a research report by explaining the role of statistics in establishing a significant difference and the types of errors that may occur in statistical analysis.

The Anatomy of a Clinical Reprint

This module discusses the six standard sections of a clinical reprint: Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Results, Discussion, References. Your familiarity with these sections will help you: Navigate as needed within your own clinical reprints; Link clinical reprints with issues of interest to clinicians; Respond to clinical questions with trial-based evidence; Bring new focus to your interactions with clinicians.

The Current Status of Evidence Based Medicine

This module considers the current status of EBM in the context of the challenges it aims to help clinicians face, and the shortcomings of traditional clinical decision-making support solutions.

The Medical Device Approval Process

This module describes the FDA's risk-based classification and controls system and premarket submission options that define each medical device's particular regulatory path to demonstrate safety and effectiveness.

Trial Design from a Clinical Perspective

This module looks at study design from a clinical perspective. It explains which types of studies apply most appropriately to various kinds of clinical inquiry and explores the comparative elements that are unique to therapeutic trials, making them especially valuable in EBM discussions.

Understanding the Evidence-Based Medicine Process

This module describes the steps that comprise the evidence-based medicine (EBM) process. A case example demonstrates how EBM can enhance clinical decision-making and improve patient outcomes.

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